Real Spellers

English Makes Sense!
This was lovely as I had not looked closely at this before.

This is the result of my search of <dyn> in the Word Searcher to see if your hypothesized base <dyne> brought forward words related in structure and meaning to the words <dynamic> and also words without the final <ic>.

Search Results for "dyn"
(19 matches)
dynamo
anodyne
dynamic
dynamos
dynasty
dynamics
dynamism
dynamite
dynastic
dynamited
dynamites
dynasties
dynamiting
aerodynamic
dynamically
aerodynamics
thermodynamic
thermodynamics
aerodynamically

I judged a word like <anodyne> to be unrelated, but the word <dynasty> grabbed my attention. Like <dynamic> this relates to the meaning "power" from the Greek dunamikos, from dunamis ‘power.’

So we have a definite etymological connection. But is there a morphological connection? (This is a page on my website that I use to get at this kind of work)

When I looked up the etymology of <dynasty> I found this:

ORIGIN late Middle English : from French dynastie, or via late Latin from Greek dunasteia ‘lordship, power,’ fromdunastēs (see dynast ).

While the meaning 'power' is in this origin, it seems that we don't have exactly the same story. More importantly, to link <dynamic> and <dynasty> to a base <dyne> I would have to propose words sums like these:

dyne/ + am + ic --> dynamic
dyne/ + ast + y --> dynasty

Now I have to prove <-am> and <-ast> as suffixes and that is not clear to me.

Instead the Greek root <dunamis> suggests to me that <dynam> is the base of <dyanmic> with the more familiar structure: dynam + ic --> dynamic.

The word <dynasty> is likely going to the same ultimate root, but with a structure: dynast + y --> dynasty.

The principle I use to guide my analysis and instruction is that I avoid going deeper in analysis than I can confidently explain. This way I avoid coming to conclusions that violate morphemic boundaries. If I am incorrect and treat what is actually complex as if it is simple, that error is less important. In this case I avoid suggesting dubious suffixes such as <-am> and <-ast>, but I can still see an etymological connection between <dynamic> and <dynasty>, even if there is no morphological connection.

So I concur with your analysis therm + o + dynam + ic --> thermodynamic.

We have the Greek signals of the medial <y> in <dynam> and the <-o-> connecting vowel letter.

So I would say congratulations on your excellent investigation!

If any of you have suggestions for refining this analysis I would be glad to hear it. 

I hope this helps!

Sincerely,

Pete

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