Hi friends!

Today we were playing around with the word <during> and began to build a matrix based on <dure>. (OK, I was playing around with it. My kids were just playing in the back yard.) And as usual, one word lead to another.

For some reason the in <obduracy> made the word <democracy> pop into my brain. Well, why not do a matrix on <democracy>? Right? Why not, indeed. I'm already stumped by this one! Here is my thought process as I work through this one:

From SOED:

democracy /0dɪˈmɒkrəsi/ noun. L16.
[ORIGIN Old French & Modern French démocratie from Late Latin democratia from Greek dēmokratia, formed as demos + -cracy.]

OK, is an attested suffix. Could that leave me with <demo> as a bound base? Hmm. But so are and . But I also have the suffixes to deal with. I didn't think was a suffix, but it is!

Even though SOED lists <-ation>as a suffix, and we know that it is actually two suffixes combined <-ate>+<-ion> , I do not believe that <-cracy>a combination of two suffixes. My only concern is whether the <cr>should be part of the bound base <democr>. If it should be, then a different base would be necessary for the <-crat>suffixed words. So I am deciding to leave the base as <demo>. Besides, the Greek word <demos>didn't have a <cr,> and I have merely dropped the <s>the <s because it no longer appears in English.

 

Update:  Edited based on Melvyn's explanation and demonstration of "standard scholarship precisely executed"  ;-) which revealed that <o> is a connecting vowel -- in words of Greek origin used for compounding -- and that <cracy> and <crat> are twin bases, not suffixes.  See comment below.   

un

deme

"common people"

    o     

cracy

"power, authority"

es



crat     

"power, authoriy"                                           

ic

 

al
ly



s





ize

ate

ed

es

ing

ion

 

 

 

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