Last week, my student attempted to spell <memorable> as <memoriable>  an effort to use what she knew about suffixing. She was trying to start from <memory> and then changed <y> to <i>, but of course you can't get to <memorable> directly from <memory>.  We wondered what was, in fact, the base of <memorable> that could get to the correct spelling in an orderly way.  Using Word Searcher, we began with <mem> and got 63 matches, which we whittled down by removing many words related to <member> and coincidental <mem> words like <homemade>, and generated the list below, which omits some of the predictably derived inflected forms of the same words with <-s>, <-ed>, and <-ing> to make the list more manageable. What we came up with is that <memory> and <memorable> share the base <memor>.  I would love to have comments on this analysis. Is this logical?  Have we missed anything? Do we have enough evidence for our conclusions?

<memor>

mindful”

All the words in the list of word sums share the same root and the same orthographic denotation:

<memor+y >

mid-13c., from Anglo-Fr. memorie, from L. memoria, from memor "mindful, remembering," from PIE base *men-/*mon- "think" (see mind (n.)). Computer sense is from 1946.

(etymonline)

<memor+y+al>

<memor+ize>

<memor+able>

<memor+ably>

<memor+ize+ed>

<memor+ize+es>

<in+memor+y+al>  --><immemorial>

<com+memor+ate>

<memor+y+al+ize>

<com+memor+ate+ing>

<com+memor+ate+ion>

<com+memor+ate+ive>

The following words share the same root and meaning but not the same orthographic base:

<memento>:  L. loan word

c.1400, "Psalm cxxxi in the Canon of the Mass" (which begins with the L. word Memento and in which the dead are commemorated), from L. memento "remember," imperative of meminisse "to remember," a reduplicated form, related to mens "mind." Meaning "reminder, warning" is from 1580s; sense of "keepsake" is first recorded 1768.

(etymonline.com)

>:  Fr. loan word

1560s, from Anglo-Fr. memorie "note, memorandum, something written to be kept in mind" (early 15c.), from L. memoria (see memory). Meaning "person's written account of his life" is from 1670s.

(etymonline.com)

<remember>: O. Fr. remembrer

c.1300, from O.Fr. remembrer (11c.), from L. rememorari "recall to mind, remember," from re- "again" + memorari "be mindful of," from memor "mindful" (see memory). Replaced native gemunan

(etymonline.com)

 <remembrance>  O. Fr “remembrer”

c.1300, from O.Fr. remembrer (11c.), from L. rememorari "recall to mind, remember," from re- "again" + memorari "be mindful of," from memor "mindful" (see memory). Replaced native gemunan.

(etymonline.com)

<memorandum>, <memoranda> (pl) L. loan word

early 15c., from L. memorandum "(thing) to be remembered," neut. sing. of memorandus, gerundive of memorare "to call to mind," from memor "mindful of" (see memory). Originally a word written at the top of a note, by 1540s it came to stand for the note itself.

(etymonline.com)

 <memo>:  clip of <memorandum>

We then used Neil and Louise Ramsden’s Word Microscope program to create a matrix for our results.  Below is part of the log of our work provided by the program.

From Gail and Elisabeth

Word Microscope Findings

memorMatrix

Specimen word: <memorable>

Working base: <memor>




Word Family Sums (12)

com  +  memor +  ate  +  ing  ->  commemorating
com  +  memor +  ate  +  ive  ->  commemorative
im  +  memor +  y  +  al  ->  immemorial
memor +  able  ->  memorable
memor +  ably  ->  memorably
memor +  y  +  al  +  ize  ->  memorialize
memor +  ize  +  ability  ->  memorizability
memor +  ize  +  ate  +  ion  ->  memorization
memor +  ize  +  es  ->  memorizes
memor +  ize  +  ing  ->  memorizing
memor +  y  ->  memory

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